Video: Lebanon, space to learn
Beirut, 23 June 2014 – How can a country educate every child when its population has expanded by 25% in less than four years? To address the needs of Syrian refugee students, some Lebanese schools have two shifts to double their capacity. Others have to turn people away. In communities around the country, from the Bekaa Valley to the Mediterranean coast, the Jesuit Refugee Service is creating schools for Syrian children in areas where educational opportunities weren't previously available.
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Jordan: online education, harnessing the skills of refugees
Amman, 31 October 2013 – As the Syrian war moves into its thirtieth month, with no end in sight, the response by Jesuit Refugee Service has continued to evolve, from emergency assistance to a strengthening of the long-term service provision. The number of Syrian refugees in Jordan is now at 500,000 and preparing refugee communities for the future has become a priority.
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Jordan: accompanying forgotten refugees in Jordan
Beirut, 25 April 2013 - Jordan has fast become a cross-roads for refugees from across the region as older conflicts and newer ones cause people to flee in search of safety and stability. In the sprawling capital city of Amman there are people from Iraq, Sudan, Somalia, Yemen and Syria, most of whom are faced with many difficulties with integration and survival on a daily basis. 

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Syria: two years of conflict threaten children's education and well-being
Beirut, Rome, Washington DC, 15 March 2013 – As the conflict in Syria enters its third year, the protection and well-being of Syrian children continue to be gravely compromised. Despite the best efforts of local and international organisations, the almost total collapse of critical infrastructure is hindering the delivery of key services. The present situation is exacerbated by the lack of sufficient funding for humanitarian assistance. The Jesuit Refugee Service urges the international community to ensure emergency support reaches the families and children most in need.
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Jordan: changing with the times, JRS adapts to the community's needs
Amman, 1 March 2013 – Abu Hassan has been the director of the informal education project for nearly five years. In its early years, the school in Ashrafiyeh catered only to Iraqi refugees. But as Jordan hosts more refugees, the JRS school has adapted to the changing situation.
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Jordan: JRS country director to visit U.S. universities and parishes
Amman, 12 February 2013 – Living and working in Jordan as Country Director for Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS), Colin Gilbert’s environs are a far cry from his hometown of Phoenix, Ariz. Mr. Gilbert returns to the U.S. from March 10 to April 10 to share his experiences, particularly in light of the Syrian crisis, at an array of Jesuit universities, high schools and parishes.
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Lebanon: language barriers prevent Syrian children from attending school
Beirut, 30 January 2013 – Their lonely-looking house is perched on a hillside, with nothing behind it except rocks and scrubby bushes. It is one of the last inhabited areas before no-man's land, between the main Lebanon - Syria border crossing. To the left of their house an enormous cement wall demarcates the start of a militarised border zone.
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Jordan: accompaniment comes first for refugees
Amman, 30 October 2012 – Situated in a quiet neighbour on top of a hill, it would be easy to confuse Ashrafiyeh as just another school in east Amman. But few of the students share a common language, or religious and cultural traditions. Most have been forced to flee conflict and survive on the margins of society. They need to be supported and kept engaged. This is the approach taken by teachers in the JRS school in Jordan.
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Jordan: without accompaniment, there is no real service
Amman, 28 May 2012 – The first day I volunteered with Jesuit Refugee Service I rode home on the bus from the informal education project with the country director, Colin Gilbert. We discussed the hardships facing urban refugees and all the JRS projects.
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